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people have gathered outside the home of nelson mandela to pay their respects. >>> donna brazil is here, john king is here and era him rasool is here. john, you were there in almost 20 years ago when nelson mandela was inaugurated. tell us what it was like. >> it remains the most powerful moment i have ever seen. before then, the vice president al gore mentioned the delegation. fidel castro was walking out of the hall, ga davi, many of the african leaders, some quite controversial to the leadership of the united states, were walking out, and then president-elect mandela, just moments he was having brief meetings. after he met with the vice president, there were a few reporters, and he shuffled over and very quietly and shook our hands and asked how we were doing. on this days when, that's who he was, this quiet dignity and grace. i want to show this. the vips were given this. and some of us hung around. >> you were working for the associated press. >> at the time. this is the new stamp they issued that day, commemorating the new president, but there was a new national anthem, a new flag
after word came thursday evening that nelson mandela had died at his home in johannesburg, mourners started flocking there to stand vigil, though they did not stand still. there were tears, but there was song, as well. it was fitting that mandela's life was celebrated in song; music was a key part of that life. jazz master and cbs news contributor wynton marsalis gives us a listen to the soundtrack of a revolution. ♪ >> marsalis: nelson mandela's lifelong fight for freedom in south africa had a secret weapon: music. ♪ one of the masters of that music, and a man who knew nelson mandela, is legendary horn man hugh masakela. we got together to remember mandela and the music that propelled a people's revolution. ♪ i was honored to join him in playing "nkosi sikelel' iafrica," the south african national anthem. ( playing "nkosi sikelel' iafrica" ) >> marsalis: the story of nelson mandela-- in jail for such a long time, comes out to lead the country-- what was the perception of mandela when he was in jail? were you aware of him and what he had done? >> we all knew him, i mean, from
there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after
>> schieffer: today on "face the nation," the world remembers nelson mandela. thousands are turning out in his country as south africa holds a national day of prayer to honor the man they call mondiva the father of modern south africa. we'll talk to friends and followers of the former president who died last week at the age of 95. that and the other news of the day on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again, the storm that left parts of the south and midwest in an icy deep freeze is now moved east, it's expected to hit virginia and mid atlantic states today then move up the east coast towards boston and new york. we begin this morning in south africa where debra begins our coverage of the day of national prayer for nelson mandela. >> good morning, bob. well this being a multi-faced country we saw many church services around the country today part of the national day of prayer and reflection nor nelson mandela. in the very famous regina muda during the anti-apartheid struggle a large service there this morning, the guiding light of this country. also prayer s
>>> this sunday, nelson mandela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa t
rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign of good for tutune, so maybe it is honor of mandela. up until this moment, people have been dancing in the streets, they've been singing songs, they've been recalling aspects of nelson ma
mandela, a special "meet the press" a special in-depth look at a world leader whose course and determination changed the course of world events. >> his journey from a prison to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us that there is true freedom and forgiveness. >> a look at mandela's life, his effect on u.s. politics and policy and how he handled controversy and criticism, all part of his enduring legacy. among my guests today, my colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a d
for this special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to re
'm fareed zakaria coming to you live from new york. starting with nelson mandela and we will ask you what happened to his legacy in africa and beyond. i have a great panel including one of mandela's close confid t confidants and the man that until this summer was obama's top national security -- why he says the u.s. doesn't need to cut a deal with hamid karzai of afghanistan. >>> next, how to understand the booming american economy. i'll ask the man who presided over great growth and some critics charge also helped create many bubbles. former fed chair, alan greenspan. >>> and as we approach the first anniversary of the new town massacre, what can the u.s. learn from other nations about gun policy. i'll take you to japan for a fascinating look at a nation that loves violent video games but has a gun death rate that is very different from america's. it's a preview of a gps special airing tonight at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >>> but first, here's my take. when nelson mandela was released from prison in 1990, i remember being struck by how old-fashioned he seemed. he spoke with the language cadenc
>>> for now, let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the bar towards justice. >>> south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95 leaving the country in mourning. >> our nation has lost its greatest -- our people have lost a father. >> elsewhere, the fed's richard bishop blames lawmakers for holding back the recovery ahead of what is expected to be a weaker payroll number in the u.s. economy. >>> germany's central bank raises its 2014 growth target for europe's largest economy as evidence shows demand from within the eurozone is finally picking up. >>> deutsche bank is to close its commodity business mainly in london and new york. display you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> a former south african president nelson mandela passed away last night at the age of 95. world leaders have been sending message messages of mourning for the leader. >> he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son our people have lost a fat
mandela. his death this past thursday saddened people all over the world and remind us how much he accomplished against such daunting odds. martha teichner will be reporting our cover story. >> he was to post apartheid south africa what george washington was to us, the father of his nation. >> there is time for the healing of the wound has come. >> he bore no grudges in spite of spending 27 years in prison. he went in a revolutionary and came out a statesman who spent the rest of his life reconciling white and black in a country where the racial divide was a chasm. later this sunday morning, what made nelson mandela a great man. >> osgood: we will consider mandela's place among the greats of history. and then turn to the manner of centuries beneath the square, a symbol of the freemasons, just who the masons are and who, what they do are one of the mysteries mo rocca will investigate. >> it is the world's oldest fraternity known for its rituals symbols and secrecy. >> what would happen if i found out the secret handshake and i weren't a mason. >> nothing. >> would you have to kill m
at the johannesburg home of nelson mandela, the man who led the fight against apartheid, dying yesterday at the age of 95. >> welcome to hq. >> nelson mandela represented reconciliation and forgiveness. he changed the nation and course of history. here is south africa's president earlier today. >> the outpouring love that we've experienced locally and abroad was unprecedented. always love madiba for teaching us that anything is possible. to overcome hatred and end it. in order to build a new nation. and society. >> he overcame hatred and anger and that's what he's remembered for, greg. >> it is less than 24 hours since the announcement of the death of nelson mandela. from our experience on the ground in south africa, what we're seeing now is just the beginning. crowds have been gather, outside the one-time home of nelson mandela, also elsewhere in south africa. part in mourning, part in celebration for the man many consider to be the father. his body was taken overnight to a nearby military morgue in preparation for a week long mourning period, but people in south africa are not waiting to express
news. i apologize. we just learned dish apologize -- this juncture to say that nelson mandela had died. nelson mandela, who has been ill for some time. they're making a formal announce independent south froze, let's cut into that. >> those who knew that this day would come, his humility, his compassion, and his humanity, and their loss. our thoughts and prayers are with the mandela family. to them we owe a debt of gratitude. they have sacrificed much and endured much so that our people could be free. our thoughts are with his wife. his former wife, winnie mandela, with this children, his grandchildren, his great-grandchildren, and the entire family, our thoughts are with his friends, comrades, and colleagues. who fought alongside him over the cause of a lifetime of struggle. our thoughts -- today mourn the loss of the one person who, more than any other, came to embody their sense of -- national. our thoughts are with the millions of people across the world who embrace him as their own. and who saw his cause as their cause. this is the moment of deep sorrow. our nation has lost its gre
. and many on the right just can't handle it. here's what i'm talking about. >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great injustice and was willing to pay a huge price for that. that's the reason he's mourned today because of that struggle he performed. but you're right. what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obama care is front and center in that. >> yes. he just compared fighting the health care law to fighting apartheid. rick santorum doesn't have to like the health care law, but he's a former u.s. senator. does he really think it compares to government-backed racial segregation. but this is the ugliest we've seen from comparing the law that saves lives to hurricane katrina to saying the law was terrorizing the country. and now senator shutdown is also freaking out. >> we were talking a few minutes ago about obama care
. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people of south africa and ultimately the world. but often when a great leader passes on, what we think we k
in south africa, as the nation mourns the death of nelson mandela. lets take a look live at the crowd gathered at the anti-apartheid leader's home. live now 7:10 p.m. in south africa, as you can see, the flowers and the candles and the cards and the notes and letters of caring and love and remembrance just get bigger and bigger, this as south africa's president has called today a national day of prayer and reflection. live in johannesburg with the very latest on this very special sunday. >> eric, we are just outside of nelson mandela's former, his final home. in fact, inside right now there is yet another prayer service going on that's being relayed to the hundreds and hundreds of people who have gathered here tonight nearby across the country today in churches and synagogues and mosques, filled with workers for the man called the father of south africa. one man with the ex-wife of nelson mandela, winnie, asked for people to pray for the nation. here is more of what we saw and heard earlier today at this wonderful, warm scene. >> it is supposed to be a day of prayer and reflection for
, but we begin this morning with our top story. nelson mandela spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became its first black president. he died at home yesterday at the age of 95. chris takes a look at mandela's life and legacy. >> history books will remember nelson mandela as one of the world' most prominent crusaders for black rights, the son of an african tribal chief, nelson mandela gave up a comfortable life and his hereditary lights to be a tribal leader to become a political activist in the fight against apartheid. the system of white rule over the majority black population. >> to feel that it is for us to continue talking nonviolence and peace. >> he was jailed for organizing demonstrations as well as treason and sabotage. he spent 27 years behind bars, but his jailing fueled the fires of freedom. his plight became an international symbol of oppression. international businesses boycotted south africa until the government finally relented and released mandela in 1990. the famous prisoner instantly became a superstar who energized the people and became the first
mandela's 70th birthday spent in a prison cell. a world away, star power was lighting up wembley stadium and shaped history in the process. up next, we will take you inside the one event mandela himself credited for changing public opinion on apartheid forever. it's donut friday at the office. and i'm low man on the totem pole. so every friday morning they send me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. unlike the barg
prochted by his praise of nelson mandela, and our political panel looks at the republican charm offensive, bill's hillary crusade, and what harry reid said. this is "state of the union." all the world is a stage and there are lots of actors these days. president obama acknowledge the u.s. would accept a peaceful nuclear energy program in iran. 85-year-old merrill newman is back on u.s. soil and with family after being detained. north korean authorities seized newman off a departing plane more than a month ago. joining me now, congressman michael mccall, chairman of the house homeland security and congressman adam schiff, a member of the house select intelligence committee. thanks for coming in on a snowy day. not always easy in washington. i want to start with merrill newman because i know his son is in your district and you had been back and forth with him. why did north korea seize him and why did they let him go? >> it's a very good question, and i'm not sure we'll ever know completely the answer. it may be as the north koreans have said that as a personal peek, they found out about hi
, president obama heading to south africa where crowds are mourning and celebrating nelson mandela. we'll have a live report on the president's expected role in tomorrow's public memorial service. >>> and right now, 85-year-old merrill newman resting at his home in california after spending more than a month in captivity in north korea. he's also sharing new details about his ordeal, including the menu. hello, i'm wolf blitzer reporting today from washington. it doesn't seem to matter where you are in the united states today. we all have one thing in common. pretty much miserable weather. if you're headed to the airport, pag your patience. more than a thousand flights already have been canceled today. on the roads, it's no better. this was the scene in yonkers, outside new york city. police say 30 people were injured in a 24-plus car pile-up on the bronx river parkway late last night. one reminder, falling ice posing a huge threat. a sheet of melting ice fell to the ground in plano, texas, damaging at least eight parked cars. thankfully no people were on street at the time. cnn is covering all
that is an honor to have met. >> blow back, newt gingrich on the hostility of his praise of nelson mandela and we look at the republican charm offensive build's hillary's crusade and what harry reid said. this is "state of the union." good morning. i'm candy crowley in washington. a deadly winter storm that already caused havoc from texas to tennessee is arriving in the northeast. those are our live pictures from around washington, d.c. this one from the capitol looking out. that is the washington moon oument that you're looking at. things are starting to get rough here. so we'll continue to monitor all of this that is beginning to hit the east coast and work its way up the mid-atlantic. so warning to folks already out there. this is likely to turn into freezing rain and ice. so lots of care out there on the rootdz today. we've already seen what it's done in other areas of the country. >>> meantime, all the world is a stage and there are lots of actors these days. at an international forum saturday, president obama acknowledged the u.s. would accept a peaceful nuclear energy program in iran. mean
planned. our hearts are with nelson mandela who died at 95. he was jailed for nearly three decades fighting against apartheid. we'll follow the story at the fox news channel. we are learning more and more about what a disaster obama care is. millions are learning they cannot keep the doctors they have on their insurance plan. they were promised they could but they can't. the website is such a mess people can't sign up. it is plagued with huge security risks and we are left with no choice. this law has to be repealed, replaced and like they did when they were selling the disastrous low to the american people, democrat democrats are lying again to save the law. they say republicans have no solutions. the republicans do have an alternative plan. it could save $2 trillion over ten years. we want you to join the conversation. log onto our facebook page. reince priebus is with us. >> thank you for having me on. you rattled off a bunch of problems just to name a few. >> just to name a few. but the president challenged republicans. i think this was a chase the rabbit trying to divert atten
of mourning, south africans reflect on the life and legacy nelson mandela. for the first time, we are hearing from his family on his death. a live report ahead. >>> answering a multibillion dollar question. why the supreme court wanted no part of it and why it might end with you paying a lot more online. an iconic image of a '70s star created by an icon of the art world, why it's not at you the forefront of a bitter legal battle. >>> hello, everyone. it's just past high noon in the east, 9:00 a.m. out west. welcome to weekends with alex wit. powerful winter weather has much of the country in a deep freeze today. the arctic blast carrying snow, sleet and freezing rain stretches from california to the northeast. the storm is already to blame for at least 11 deaths including three in california. icy conditions are making driving perilous. >> it felt like my car was kind of weaving back and forth because it was so slick. >> and texas is one of the hardest hit as icy conditions there force the cancellation of the dallas marathon today as well as 1600 flights at dallas fort worth international birp
of nelson mandela, hear from a writer from the "new york times" the writer of a 6,000-page obituary that actually got to interview mandela for it. # ♪ stacy's mom has got it on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ [ male announcer ] the beautifully practical and practically beautiful cadillac srx. get the best offers of the season now. lease this 2014 srx for around $349 a month. during the season's best event from cadillac. ♪ i'm here to say a few words about the power of baking stuff with nestle toll house morsels. you can heal a broken heart with a bundt cake. make a monday mornin' feel like a friday afternoon with some nestle toll house morsels. let's close our laptops and open our ovens. these things don't bake themselves. we have to bake them for one another. we can bake the world a better place one toll house cookie at a time. nestle. good food, good life. i get out a lot... except when it's too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect my family. your coughing woke me up again. i w
news on nelson mandela. i want to bring to you right now if we can. >> kelly, thank you very much. this a special breaking news. one of the great men of the 20th century, nelson mandela, one of the most inspiring people in the world, has died. after a long illness, it is just now being announced on south african television, that nelson mandela, a man who served decades in prison for his crusade for human rights and dignity in his home country, has died. he was 93 years old, if i'm doing my math correctly there. he's 95 years old. excuse me. 95 years old. he had 17 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. a man that really led the way for human justice and rights in his nation. we'll bring you more details on the passing of nelson mandela very, very shortly. and we'll have news, i'm sure, from washington, from the president and the white house in mourning over the death of nelson mandela. kelly, back to you. >> tyler math senn, thank you very much. i believe john harwood is standing by in washington. john harwood with more detames. potentially, any reaction at this early hour, joh
current and ten former heads of state for the memorial for nelson mandela. among them, president obama, who along with first lady michelle obama left washington about an hour ago for south africa, expected to arrive in johannesburg early tomorrow morning. joining them will be former presidents bill clinton and george w. bush, david cameron and ban ki-moon among scores of other dignitaries. errol barnett in johannesburg for us. tomorrow is taking place in soccer city during the world cup, a huge stadium, 90,000 plus seats. given the interest and the crowds behind you now, will that be big enough to accommodate everybody? >> reporter: in a word, john, no, and that's why the government has facilitated three, count them three overthrow stadiums for people who want to attend tuesday's memorial service, plus they will be broadcasting the ceremony via livestream to 90 big screens set up all over the country. john, i'm not sure how many university football games you've been to but what's happening around me now you could compare to a battle of the bonds. over my right shoulder a south african
what would happen in south africa had there not been a nelson mandela? it would be running in blood. not too long ago, they weren't allowed to lynch a man or a woman, so i don't think nelson mandela's death was in vain. his life was not. i will never be the same. we thank him for coming. we thank him for teaching us. and we thank him for loving us all. all. >> what a reflection. harry smith, your thoughts this morning. >> a redemptive morning to be able to spend it with maya angelou, but how eye-opening it was to be black and living in south africa. steve beko ends up getting pulled over by the cops in south africa. he's dead 24 hours later. you rick yosk your life just breathing and being black in south africa, and to see this man come out and talk about a teachable moment. >> thank you very much, harry smith. when we come back, we'll talk about other politics of the week. how did mandela's death overshadow president obama's push for obama care this week? plus, have we finally 6 children, 44 years... it's been a happy union. he does laundry, and i do the cleaning. there's only two
, they may use hewlett packard. >> and in the news, nelson mandela passed away at the age of 95 after a long illness. the president among those paying tribute to mandela yesterday. >> let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived and a man who took history in his hands and bent of arc of history toward justice. >> i never got to meet him. i got to spend a weekend with bishop tutu, who is very prominently involved with this and he explained to me there should have been a revolution, there should have been a terrible bloodshed, just absolutely what we regard to be the greatest conflagration. didn't happen. they did a truth and reconciliation. that was designed to make it to say, listen, the whites did bad but we're moving forward. it's funny, you don't really understand. if it didn't happen, if there wasn't a civil war -- he prevented a civil war. martin luther king may have prevented a civil war in our country. you go back to the days when that happened, you cannot believe there were not huge riots. people were talking about concentration camps. no. mandela didn't let it
. speaking of, i don't know, the more you do it, the better you get. nelson mandela, someone who was consistent and such a leader. u.s. markets observed moments of silence for him on friday. you know, he visited the floor of the exchange in 2002. and i remember he went and met so many people, the shoe shine guy. he went out of his way to meet everyone. he also, you know, he worked with some of the biggest names in corporate america to change the way the business gets done in south africa. he reportedly went to coca-cola during his visit in the u.s. in the '90s. rejected the company to sponsor his trip because it did still business in south africa. what influence did he have on the how companies behave? >> it was quite important because he did something which surprised people. remember, the anc was a radical revolutionary organization. it drew a lot of support from communist countries, from revolutionary movements, castro, gadhafi, arafat. everyone thought he was going to be a left wing maniac. he was very pro business. he was very pro markets because he understood the future of s
, what are the wrong questions that the media have been asking about mandela and about mandela's legacy over the course of the past week? >> i think it's been a very, you know, how did he -- i know asking me, pretty much, how did he influence you. and i'm like, that's -- we can go so much further than that. and i think a good conversation to have, especially, in the wake of his passing is, there's such a rich history to south africa. and it's definitely not just black and white. and i think a lot of americans, and especially black americans, coming from mixed cultures could really, really understand and delve into and relate more if we actually -- you know, we have the internet. and we could go through it and research and say, okay, what do i really want to know about this country? it's not just apartheid, it's not just mandela, you know, there's two things and we don't go any further than that. i think it could open up a bigger conversation. >> it's an interesting point, what south africa becomes, as a symbol then for the entire american electorate is, it is apartheid, and it is someho
. >>> the obamas joining more than 50 world leaders paying tribute to nelson mandela tomorrow. president george w. bush and his wife will join them, president clinton and jimmy carter attending also. a big test for south africa's government as it plans the memorial expecting 94,000 people at fnb stadium where they had the world cup in 2010 and another 100,000 plus expected outside at overflow areas around the city. many details were worked out well in advance. politico is reporting the last-minute services are pretty daunting. concerns from the motorcade route to his safety once inside. meanwhile, sunday marked an official day of prayer across south africa. but in churches the scene was as much celebratory as mournful. other parts of the world, ukraine's president facing major unrest and a 48-hour deadline threat to disband his government. anti-government protesters yesterday toppled the stature of lenin. he's, of course, the founder of the soviet union, demonstrators took turns attacking the statue with hammers sort of reminiscent of the berlin wall falling in the early '90s and smashed it to pi
.m. pacific. of course, the big news this evening, legendary south african leader nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. we have a
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)